a miscellany

stuff I like

liquid-lightning:

librarienne:

rose-verres:

“A three second exposure meant that subjects had to stand very still to avoid being blurred, and holding a smile for that period was tricky. As a result, we have a tendency to see our Victorian ancestors as even more formal and stern than they might have been.”

I’ve reblogged this before and I will reblog it again.

This is so great

(via wishuponafallentardis)

somewhereinthisuniverse:

These mesmerizing sculptures are the work of William Ricketts, a rare Australian born in 1898 who was in awe of the connection the Aborigine people have with the land. Hidden deep within a lush Australian rainforest are a set of mystical Aborigine sculptures seemingly merged into the natural surroundings. Moss covered torsos of men, women and children protrude from tree trunks and boulders. Some reach heavenward with widespread wings, others envelop each other protectively – all are symbols of the relationship the indigenous Australian Aborigines have with nature.

(via foxestacado)

nobodyiswatchingus:

Waterfall amidst a mountain covered in ash after a volcano eruption.
Taken in Iceland. One of the most unique landscape photos I’ve ever seen.

nobodyiswatchingus:

Waterfall amidst a mountain covered in ash after a volcano eruption.

Taken in Iceland. One of the most unique landscape photos I’ve ever seen.

(via daasgrrl)

1690s book with filigree silver binding - National Library of Sweden

This binding is an exquisite example of Danish filigree technique
from the 1690s.It belongs to the National Library’s Huseby
Collection and was once owned by Karren Mogensdotter Skoug.
Her name and the year 1692 are engraved on the inside of the clasps. -(x)

(Source: tirairgid, via graveglamour)